Tagged: UE

District 12 in “The Hunger Games” (aka Henry River Mill Village): Part 1

I heard about this abandoned mill town before “The Hunger Games” movie hit the theaters.  It is actually how I came to know “The Hunger Games” Trilogy.  I wanted to explore this abandoned town after I read about it a few years ago but had also read that the roads to this town were all blocked off because a movie was being filmed at this location.  I thought nothing much of it except that I was very disappointed that I could not explore Henry River Mill Village.  However, I waited it out, and eventually took the journey to Hildebran, NC; when we arrived it appeared as if no one had stepped foot in this ghost town for ages.  The only indication that part a major motion picture had been shot here was the “Pastries” and “Cakes” that had been added to the main town building; this even looked as though it had always been there.  And trying to make a long story short, I discovered the movie filmed at this location was called “The Hunger Games”, found out it was based on the first of a three book series, read the books, became obsessed and was one of the many fanatics that saw the first showing at 12:00am.  (In the movie this town was portrayed as District 12)

You can find a good amount of interesting history about this abandoned mill town online.  Because I personally like pictures more than words and I fear I may already be reaching the end of your attention span, I will let you seek out this info instead of me lengthening this post with the town’s history.

This is private property and I have heard that there is now a good force of security protecting the property since “The Hunger Games” hit the theaters.  Because of this, I am very excited about the fact that I was able to take these photos prior to the fan madness in North Carolina so I can share them with all of you.  Hope you enjoy!

There is a screen shot in the movie very similar to this photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I made a point to stop here a second time on our way to the Smoky Mountains in the Fall

North Carolina’s First Juvenile Detention Facility: Part 1

This juvenile detention facility was opened in 1909 was to serve as a facility to place troubled youths separate from adults.  The institution originally spanned 280 acres, with the campus covering 88 of those acres.  The state reduced the population of the facility in the 1970s because ideas about treating youths changed and they were seldom incarcerated for offenses as minor as delinquency.

Eventually, a new facility was built on the grounds that currently is used for serious offenders involved in drug abuse and weapons-related charges.   About 150 young men are generally held here.  The new facility, covering about sixty acres, is enclosed by a 15-foot-high fence.  Many of the original buildings have all been left to decay…

Part 2 will include photos of the inside of some of these buildings.  Follow me by email and get a notification when Part 2 is posted!